Vivo V20 Pro Review, Full Specs, Features, and Price

vivo v20 pro

For the better part of this year, Vivo has launched new smartphones on a very regular basis in the Indian industry. In reality, over the past month or so, the company has added two new devices in the form of the V20 (review) and V20 SEE to its V20 lineup (review). I’ll confess, having reviewed both, I was very impressed with the pair and eager to see what the V20 lineup has next in tow. Join the Vivo V20 Pro, a handset that retails for Rs 29,990 and bears all of its younger siblings’ signature features. Besides, the smartphone provides few upgrades of its own, such as 5G capabilities and dual selfie shooters. A few, such as the inclusion of a higher refresh rate screen, even miss out on it, which would have made it a more desirable ‘Pro’ unit. Competitive smartphones such as OnePlus Nord (review) and Realme X3 SuperZoom (review) are nonetheless put squarely in the crosshairs of the V20 Pro. I’ve previously given my initial observations of the V20 Pro, and now it’s time to dig into the meat of the matter. Here is my full summary and study of the Vivo V20 Pro to see if it renders an extremely crowded upper mid-range market a viable competitor.

v20 pro
image source vivo(no copyright infringement is intended)

Design

The architecture of the Vivo V20 Pro is almost similar to the V20, meaning that I’m a fan. How extremely light and thin the handset is is what strikes me the most about the V20 Pro. Currently, the V20 Pro is the smallest 5G phone in the segment, per Vivo, and I agree with the assertion. You will certainly be in awe of the phone’s fragile and premium in-hand feel, coming in at 7.38mm and weighing a mere 170g. There is a familiar frosted matte-like finish on the back of the handset, which has been carried over from the V20 to the newer edition. Vivo calls it the style of AG Matte Glass and rests assured, it’s very good to the touch and easy to look at. The Midnight Jazz color version of the phone also deserves a note, as it mixes the two subtle shades of grey in a changing gradient pattern and gives a stealthy look to the V20 Pro. On the back, Vivo has used Corning Gorilla Glass 5 safety so slapping on a case is still a safe idea. Speaking of which, on the rear, the company produced a translucent silicone case that does not disguise the color scheme on the unit and at the same time protects it from scuffs.

Display

Over the past few years, Vivo has launched beautiful screens on its V series phones and the Pro edition even gets a 6.44-inch, 20:9 AMOLED screen with FHD+ resolution, just like the V20 and V20 SE. However, instead of a waterdrop-notch, the V20 Pro implements a bigger iPhone-Esque notch that houses the phone’s dual-selfie camera system. That said, the company’s decision to omit a higher refresh screen on each of its V series phones is one gripe that I have with Vivo. With the V20 Pro’s panel, users used to 60Hz displays would feel right at home and I had no concerns as far as the viewing experience on the phone goes. I can characterize the V20 Pro’s screen with outstanding viewing angles, pronounced blacks, great contrast ratios, and maximum brightness. The V20 Pro also helps customers to adjust the color scheme and temperature and has toggles available for anti-flicker, dim mode, and eye-care mode with low brightness. Vivo hasn’t specified how bright the screen is, but whether indoors or in harsh sunshine, I have had no trouble with legibility. Thanks to the WideVineL1 certification, streaming HD content through OTT platforms including Netflix, Hotstar, and Amazon Prime is also a  go. On the Vivo V20, I loved viewing and streaming video content and that experience was also moved on to the Pro moniker.

Camera

There is very little difference between the camera of the Vivo V20 and the V20 Pro. The 64MP Samsung ISOCELL GW1 camera, which is backed by an 8MP ultra-wide and 2MP mono sensor, performs the primary photo-taking capability on both phones. The color science of Vivo was a mixed bag, but the processing of images has changed significantly over the past couple of V series iterations. More true-to-life compositions with clearer colors and specifics in the picture have replaced the earlier pastel-like images. With HDR, the V20 Pro will generate outstanding shots in daylight, and exposure management is handled very well. The ultra-wide lens of the V20 Pro suits the color temperature of the primary sensor, giving it a more natural appearance. Motion Autofocus to keep moving objects in view and 3D soundtracking in a noisy environment to help hear the voice of your subject. Night Mode does a decent job of keeping the information in low light and smoothing out unnecessary noise. The dual vision and picture-in-picture mode that can shoot a video from the front and back cameras at the same time is included in Vivo. The 44MP selfie photographer backed by a 105-degree field of view ultra-wide 8MP lens is a kind of trademark selling point for the V10 Pro Pro. Like the V20, together with a couple of nifty selfie video features like Eye AutoFocus technology, you get the highest resolution selfie camera in the category. When the lighting behind my mask changes, the camera is momentarily jittery, but it is something that can be changed through future app upgrades. A 12MP selfie camera with an 8MP lens is available for the Nord’s camera and can capture 4K footage @ 60fps with 720p slow-mo @ 240 fps. It is powered by a Snapdragon 765G SoC with a better ISP than what you can get with the 720G chipset of the former one.

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Software

The Vivo V20 Pro runs Android 11-based FunTouch OS 11, software-wise. I’m impressed that Vivo was among the first OEMs to launch its devices out-of-the-box with Android 11. For a thorough understanding of the software ramifications for the V20 Pro, you can read my Vivo V20 analysis. To sum up: new navigation buttons, a streamlined notification tray, a configuration menu that is more accessible, and decreased bloatware overall.

Performance

For everyday handheld computing activities, the V20 Pro is the optimal machine. Standard activities are carried out quickly, such as moving applications or opening a multitude of Chrome windows. Heavy-duty play can be carried out, but not at the fastest settings and frame rates, such as Call of Duty Phones. An in-display fingerprint sensor that provides snappy authentication includes other features on the handset. The phone is 5G-capable, but I wouldn’t take that into account when making a purchase, largely because the country’s 5G networks are not available. It happens that the single-fired speaker at the bottom is only above average and is not exactly as loud as I’d like it to be. GSM, HSPA, and LTE are also enabled on the handset. The identification of the face is still incredibly rapid, but slightly less stable since a 2D face model is used instead of 3D.

Battery life and charging 

The comparatively lower capacity of the 4,000mAh battery on the V20 Pro marginally surprised him. I wondered how long the V20 Pro would last with handsets like the Galaxy M51 (review) packing in a ludicrous 7,000mAh battery for the same cost. As planned, the response is not too long, but luckily, there is the 33W FlashCharge technology that can easily juice up the V20 Pro. The phone lasted an outstanding 17h 15min in the PCMark 10 Battery, 2.0 test. Even, the benchmark is not the most useful metric for battery power measurement. My regular video loop test on half brightness and half volume revealed that the phone only lasted about 21 hours, which is in the average area. It takes about 1 hour to completely charge the phone, while 50 percent can be loaded out in about 25 minutes. It quickly makes it a one-day phone and stops at around 15 percent battery for my daily use of the phone. Running any graphically demanding activities will exhaust the battery more abundantly, potentially killing the handset before the day is over.

Verdict

My regular video loop test on half brightness and half volume revealed that the phone only lasted about 21 hours, which is in the average area. It takes about 1 hour to completely charge the phone, while 50 percent can be loaded out in about 25 minutes. It quickly makes it a one-day phone and stops at around 15 percent battery for my daily use of the phone. Running any graphically demanding activities will exhaust the battery more abundantly, potentially killing the handset before the day is over.

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Hello techies, My Name is Hemaja Burud. I am the tech content writer and co-founder of Technozive.com. I am currently pursuing EXTC engineering. I am very passionate about tech products and tech content.