Honor Band 6 Available in India: checkout price specs and review

Honor Band 6

Honor has finally launched its smart band in India, which is now owned by Shenzhen Zhixin technologies. In India, the much-anticipated Honor Band 6 has been released at a reasonable price. The band was first introduced in China a few months ago. The Honor Band 6, which has smartwatch features, is actually a fitness band with a large display. Honor fitness bands are known for their accuracy, and this one with a larger screen appears to be a great deal for fitness buffs.

Honor Band 6
image source hihonor.com (no copyright infringement is intended)

The Honor Band 6 looks a lot like the Honor Watch ES, which has a rectangular display as well, but the Band 6 has more features than the Watch ES. Interestingly, the band was billed as the world’s first fitness tracker with a full-screen display when it was first released in China. So, let’s take a look at the Honor Band 6’s price, as well as its specifications and features.

Price and availability of the Honor Band 6

In India, Honor has announced the Band 6, but it is not yet available for purchase. The Honor Band 6 will go on sale for the first time on Flipkart on June 14. In India, the device is priced at Rs 3999. It comes in three different colours: Coral Black, Coral Pink, and Sandstone Grey. The smart band was released in China in two versions: the base model cost CNY 249 (roughly Rs. 2,800) and the NFC model cost CNY 289 (roughly Rs. 2,900). (roughly Rs. 3,300).

Specifications for the Honor Band 6

A 1.47-inch colour AMOLED display with 2.5D curved glass protection is featured on the Honor Band. Because a large screen means more display area than traditional fitness trackers, the display is one of the highlights of Band 6. The Honor Band 6 includes features such as continuous heart rate monitoring, SpO2 monitoring, and sleep tracking. In terms of battery life, the company claims that you can charge the watch in 10 minutes and wear it for three days. When fully charged, the watch has a battery life of up to 14 days with typical use and 10 days with heavy use.

Honor Band 6 Review

It’s worth noting that, while Honor began as a Huawei subsidiary, the two companies split up in 2020.

However, it appears that, at least with the Band 6, it is still following Huawei’s design approach. To get things set up, it uses the same software and Huawei Health companion app.

Honor Band 6
image source hihonor.com (no copyright infringement is intended)

The design of the Band 6 differs from that of the Band 5 and is more akin to the Honor Watch ES smartwatch/fitness tracker hybrid that was released in 2020.

You’ll get a black 43mm case that’s 11mm thick and weighs only 18g. This is paired with a non-removable strap that comes in black, grey, or pink colour options.

We had to live with the grey version with the black case, which is sporty, a little plain, and not particularly stylish, but it’s comfortable to wear, wraps securely around your wrist, and hasn’t given us any reason to take it off.

It shares a lot of similarities with the new Huawei Band 6 thanks to the larger, wider screen. Huawei’s tracker, on the other hand, appears to have a case similar to the Huawei Watch Fit, as well as more strap colour options.

It’s still one you can wear in the pool or in the shower because it has a 5ATM water resistance rating, which means it can be submerged in water up to 50 metres deep.

Honor Band 6 – fitness tracking

The Honor Band 6, like its predecessor, is designed primarily to provide the core features of step tracking and sleep monitoring.

Accelerometer and gyroscope motion sensors are used to provide this, as well as step counts, distance travelled, and the ability to track your active hours. Huawei’s TruSleep sleep tracking software captures sleep duration, stages, and scores, as well as providing sleep quality insights.

Honor Band 6
image source hihonor.com (no copyright infringement is intended)

The daily activity tracking widget and watch faces that can display stats can both be used to track daily activity. To see your activity trends over the week, go to the Activity records menu and expand on those stats. The device itself collects a lot of data, which should help you spend less time in the companion app.

From a precision standpoint, we discovered that the daily step counts on Fitbit’s Sense smartwatch were generally 100-200 steps off.
Inactivity alerts are sent out by the Honor Band 6 to keep you moving throughout the day, and the larger screen makes it harder to ignore them. Those prompts tell you to move, and they also remind you to get up and walk after a meal, which is unusual. You can see what activities those steps were generated from in the app, as well as trends over longer time periods such as months and years.

When it’s time to go to bed, the Band has a sleep menu where you can see your most recent sleep and nap time, as well as more data from the Huawei Health app. You can see a breakdown of sleep stages as well as a sleep score in the app, which gives you some insight into your sleep quality.

We compared the sleep tracking to a Fitbit Sense, which is the gold standard in the industry. A side-by-side comparison is shown above.

In addition to fitness tracking, Honor also includes guided breathing exercises, which have become a bit of a standard for trackers in recent years. These can be done on the band, and the breathing exercises can be adjusted to last no more than 3 minutes. A female cycle tracker is also available, which provides an on-band experience by allowing users to see upcoming fertile windows.

Honor Band 6: Sports tracking

If you’re looking for a fitness tracker that goes beyond steps and sleep, the Honor Band 6 also has sports tracking capabilities.

Running (indoor and outdoor), cycling (indoor and outdoor), pool swimming, elliptical machine, indoor rowing walking, and a freestyle workout mode are among the 10 workout modes available. There’s a motion sensor on board to track activities, and you can use connected GPS to map routes when you’re outside.

Automatic exercise recognition for running, walking, indoor rowing, and elliptical sessions are available if you like the idea of the tracker knowing when to start tracking for you.

We used both the connected GPS and the run tracking. It fell 1km short of a Garmin Enduro without it, and run metrics were extremely inaccurate. It was far more reliable and in line with the data captured by our Garmin Enduro watch when GPS was enabled (screens above). Before you can see those real-time metrics on the tracker’s screen, you’ll need to get things started on the app first.

If you want to learn more about your stats, you’ll need to download the Huawei Health app. It isn’t the most attractive app, but it does a good job of breaking down the data in a way that is easy to understand.

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Honor Band 6: Heart rate monitoring and SpO2

Most fitness trackers’ Achilles heel is heart rate monitoring, and it’s something we’ve previously criticized Honor/Huawei wearables, particularly for exercise. Huawei’s TruSeen 4.0 heart rate sensor technology is included in Band 6 to provide on-the-spot measurements, continuous monitoring, stress monitoring, and heart rate data during exercise.

It’s a bit of a mixed bag when it comes to continuous and resting heart rate insights. The resting heart rate was sometimes 1-2 beats per minute higher than the resting heart rate measured by a dedicated heart rate monitor. The readings on the Band 6 compared to a heart rate monitor built into a medical-grade pulse oximeter were significantly higher on other occasions.

Honor Band 6: Smartwatch features

The Band 6 runs on a proprietary operating system that, while not called Huawei’s Lite OS, resembles that of other Honor and Huawei watches and fitness trackers.

Honor Band 6
image source hihonor.com (no copyright infringement is intended)

It works with both Android and iPhone users, but Android users get the most comprehensive support. This gives you access to notifications from both native and third-party apps. Music controls (only for Android users), weather forecasts, and a remote camera shutter feature are all included. You also have a watch face collection here, with the option to add your own photos to make more personalised watch faces.

Because of the larger display, these features are inherently more pleasant to use. You can see your notification stream by swiping up from the main watch screen, with app icons to clearly identify where they’re coming from. You can’t respond to notifications, and emails only show subject lines, but we found the experience to be satisfactory.

Features such as music controls and weather forecasts are well-suited to the larger screen, and navigating the software is simple. The smartwatch features you get here are adequate for the price. As previously stated, iPhone owners do not have access to those music controls, but if you care about notifications, watch faces, and weather updates, you can get them on the Apple Watch.

Honor Band 6: Battery life

Despite the increase in screen size, Honor still claims that its fitness tracker will last weeks rather than days, and it is capable of doing so.

The battery capacity has been increased to 180mAh, up from 100mAh on the Honor Band 5, and it should last up to 14 days in normal use and up to 10 days in heavy use. The typical usage entails enabling continuous heart rate monitoring and tracking only one 30-minute workout per week. With heavy usage, this entails incorporating more advanced sleep monitoring as well as working out for 60 minutes per week.

Hits

  • Nice, large display
  • Long-lasting battery
  • Tracking your fitness is essential.

Misses

  • Not everyone likes the sporty look.
  • There is no GPS built-in.
  • For high-intensity exercise, heart rate accuracy is crucial.

Also Read

REVIEW OVERVIEW
Honor Band 6
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Hello techies, My Name is Hemaja Burud. I am the tech content writer and co-founder of Technozive.com. I am currently pursuing EXTC engineering. I am very passionate about tech products and tech content.